About Judy Berman

Stories, and the art of telling them, fascinate me. I am a writer, a teacher and former reporter - both in newspapers and on radio. In this blog, I will share some of the stories I heard growing up, from our travels, our family and experiences on the job and off.

I’m Still Standing

Audrey Hepburn - Breakfast at Tiffany's

By Judy Berman

It was September. The leaves were turning. It’s a time when the elements begin to make me feel hemmed in.

That feeling only intensified when I learned that I was being transferred to the newspaper’s Rome bureau – not the exotic city in Italy, but a small city in Upstate New York.

There were two women in the Rome bureau, a district circulation manager and a receptionist. Within two weeks, they were gone.

I dreaded working in an office all alone.

It hit me – much later – that I was looking at this situation all wrong.

This is where, if this was a music video, the phonograph needle would be scratched across the full surface of the album until your ears bled.

Elton John in 1980s

At times, I felt like the Maytag repairman at the Rome bureau. Few of the calls were for me. Most were from irate customers wondering where their papers were.

The good news? I didn’t have an editor hovering over my desk, pacing back and forth, waiting for me to “send my copy to rewrite, sweetheart.”

The transfer cut my 55-mile, one-way commute to the main office in Utica to 40 miles. Winning!

In winter, however, I might eat up that savings when I shadowed a snowplow at 10-miles-per-hour.

That beautiful white blanket is a deceptive and seductive enchantress. Amnesia sets in each winter, and you forget the misstep that can alter your skip across the highway into a careening, nerve-racking, steering-wheel-clutching, off-road tumble.

Still, I met fascinating people stranded by snowstorms just off the thruway on my way to work. For a reporter, hoping to score a weather quote, perfect!

Mask - Germany

With Christmas fast approaching, I didn’t bother to decorate the office, as I was the only one who would see them. So, time saved twice. I wouldn’t have to put away any decorations, either.

Unlike the residents of Cicely, Alaska, in the TV show, “Northern Exposure,” I wasn’t isolated or trapped in a remote location.

Any time I wanted, I could head down to the police station or city court. While I was gathering info for the police blotter or a story, we’d share a few laughs. There, I learned some things that proved valuable later.

Sometimes, it led to a bigger story. Others, to excellent contacts.

Six months after my transfer, a fellow reporter, Pat Corbett, joined me in the Rome office. We would bounce ideas off each other and joke about some happening that day.

At first, there was only one computer. So we took turns using it to file our stories from the bureau to the main office. Then, we commandeered a second computer from the main office – with permission, of course.

Elton John in 1980s - I'm Still Standing - video

A year after my transfer, I was back in the main office assigned to a job that I really wanted: night cops reporter. I’m grateful that what I learned in Rome paved the way for this beat.

It took a friend of mine at a competing paper in Syracuse to put my transfer into the proper perspective for me. A few years after my move, his paper opened more bureaus.

I asked how he felt about that. With a twinkle in his eye, the reporter joked that the main office was in a shambles. The move for them “is like when the royalty shipped their children to a safe haven during the war so they wouldn’t be hurt.”

Love that warped sense of humor.

Did looking at a situation thru a new lens ever alter your view?

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Music Video: “I’m Still Standing,” by Elton John (1983) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHwVBirqD2s

1. Main Photo – Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) – movie trailer screenshot. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/Audrey_Hepburn_esmorza_al_Tiffany%27s.bmp.jpg/640px-Audrey_Hepburn_esmorza_al_Tiffany%27s.bmp.jpg

2. Photo: Mask – Germany – Author: Gexon from Darmstadt, Germany. Photo taken June 12, 2011. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bf/Mask_No._231432_-_Flickr_-_Gexon.jpg/400px-Mask_No._231432_-_Flickr_-_Gexon.jpg

3. Photo: Elton John in 1980s – author – http://www.flickr.com/photos/hiabba/ http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/66/Elton_John_in_1980s.jpg

4. Photo: Elton John by piano, video screen shot from “I’m Still Standing.”

 

In the Misty Moonlight

 

Judy, deer and cousin Tony 2

By Judy Berman

An old, dusty, red tin box, tucked into a corner of the closet, holds a treasure-trove of memories.

Like a time machine, it transports me. The contents, however, might mystify today’s teenagers.

Black round discs with a huge hole in the middle. I smile as I pluck one of the 45s from the stack. The song takes me back to an unforgettable trip to visit my Aunt Martha’s family in Pennsylvania.

Some of my recollections are as foggy as the misty moonlight that hung low in the night sky.

But one thing remains certain. I had a wonderful time.

My aunt lived in Three Square Hollow. Just the name conjures a remote, woodsy place filled with mystery and adventure, and neighbors a distance away.

My Mom told me that I always referred to Aunt Martha as my fabulously wealthy aunt. The reason? I think it had something to do with a spring on her property.

If I close my eyes, I can see it still. In the woods, water tripping over polished stones. I swear that water tasted better than soda pop. That description always cracked Mom up. But it was true.

Aunt Martha wasn’t well-to-do in terms of money stashed away in some bank or hoarded in a secret hiding place.

She was rich beyond measure in kindness, generosity and just plain good fun.

Judy and Aunt Martha2 - Aug. 1993

Her home was nestled in a wonderful place to romp and roam.

Years earlier, when my family visited, a fawn stumbled into their lives. It was abandoned. While I was there, I fed it and the tiny critter squirmed as I held it. Quite a thrill. I never knew what to expect there.

What was not surprising is there were children everywhere. Hardly a surprise. Aunt Martha had 11 children. Some of them were grown and on their own. The ones at home were determined to show me a good time.

One night, we hopped into a car. My cousin, Danny, egged me on to take the wheel. That was pretty courageous on his part, as I didn’t have a driver’s license.

Not a chance of any traffic stops, though. There wasn’t a police car within miles. We had a ball.

When I arrived, I was almost a stranger to them. We rarely saw each other as my family had moved to another state when I was nearly eight. Yet I got a warm welcome and I felt right at home.

Mountains - mists

The night before I was to return home, they really surprised me.

They threw a party for me. It might have included a bonfire, marshmallows and a cookout. I don’t remember.

What I will never forget is this song, “In the Misty Moonlight,” that played that night, and how special my aunt and cousins all made me feel.

Like visiting royalty.

 

Is there a song that reminds you of a special place or time? Is there a time when others surprised you by doing something special for you?

 

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Music Video: In the Misty Moonlight by Jerry Wallace https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN1qbW6_Zzk 

1. Main Photo: Me holding a fawn and my cousin Tony Barnhart at our Aunt Martha’s.

2. Photo: Me and Aunt Martha – Three Square Hollow, Pennsylvania – 1993

3. Photo: Mountains – mists, Environmental Protection Agency – Date: May 1973 http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/15/MISTS_OF_THE_HIGH_PEAKS_REGION_-_NARA_-_554398.jpg/640px-MISTS_OF_THE_HIGH_PEAKS_REGION_-_NARA_-_554398.jpg

Those Driveway Moments

Sorry Fugo

By Judy Berman

I’m sure it is an unsettling sight to passers-by when they see someone just sitting in a car and laughing.

The motor’s running. For 15 minutes, I am transfixed. I can’t turn off the ignition and leave to go into the store.

These are known as “driveway moments.”

Sometimes, it’s a song you want to hear all the way thru and maybe sing along. Other times, you’re spellbound by the story you hear and wait for the inevitable conclusion.

Still others, you just don’t want the story to end.

One of those stories was T. Coraghessan Boyle’s “Sorry Fugo.”

Albert blames Willa Frank’s caustic review as the reason one of his friend’s businesses went under. The headline over her column read: “Udolpho’s: Troglodytic Cuisine in a Cavelike Atmosphere.”

He shuddered and knew it was only a matter of time before she “slipped like a spy, like a murderess,” into his restaurant, D’Angelo’s and skewered him as she had done to the others.

The night she shows up, the staff is in a tizzy. This night: it’s a disaster. But Albert knew Willa Frank would be back. “Twice more. And he would be ready for her.”

When she did return, “Albert put his soul into each dish, arranged and garnished the plates with all the patient care and shimmering inspiration of a Toulouse-Lautrec bent over a canvas, and watched, defeated, as each came back to the kitchen half-eaten.”

Revenge is a dish best served cold. Albert had a marvelous scheme cooked up for Willa Frank’s final visit.

To tell you how Albert turned the tables on Willa Frank would spoil the story. I will just say the ending was delicious.

Other stories expose us to places, people and things we’d never meet. Some are haunting, like the story about Lucy the chimpanzee who was raised as a human.

Lucy the chimpanzee coloring

Lucy was only two days old when she was adopted by psychologist Dr. Maurice K. Temerlin and his wife Jane. Lucy looked adorable in her little dresses as she drew in a coloring book and learned sign language.

But there came a day when it was necessary for Lucy to leave the family who raised her.

Janis Carter, a University of Oklahoma graduate student, accompanied Lucy and another chimpanzee to the wild in Gambia. They were being released in the coastal West African country.

Lucy the chimpanzee and Janis Carter hugging2

Lucy did not adjust easily. Janis Carter remained with the chimps longer than she intended to help them survive in the wild. For me, the final photo of Lucy hugging Janis Carter as Janis was leaving the area was heartbreaking. (The link to the podcast is below.)

Other stories are laugh-out-loud funny, and I’ve shared them with family and friends.

The tall tale, “The Beard,” by Fred Chappell is a classic example. It’s in his book, “I Am One of You Forever” and is worth picking up.

It centers on Uncle Gurton, who has a long, flowing beard of unknown length, and his visit to 10-year-old Jess and his family. Uncle Gurton’s main talent is eating voraciously.

When asked if he’d like more to eat, Uncle Gurton smiles. About the only thing he does say is: “No thank you. I’ve had an elegant sufficiency. Any more would be a superfluity.” My students delight in that line, much more than the cut-to-the-chase comment: “No thanks. I’ve had enough. Any more and I might burst.”

Then, Uncle Gurton disappears whenever he’s needed to help out with chores.

One night, their curiosity about the beard got the best of Jess and his Dad with hilarious results.

Dancing

The fast-paced life can wait. Sit back, relax. So what if you’re still in the driveway. Take the time to listen to a really great story. You’ll be glad you did.

Sept. 10th marked my third anniversary on WordPress. Thank you for all your thoughtful and funny comments, for the friendships I’ve found on WordPress, and for your support. I want to especially thank my husband, Dave Berman, who has edited my posts these past three years. Thanks, Honey.

Are there times when the world stands still until that special song or story ends? Please share some of your favorite driveway moments.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

1. Main Photo: “Sorry Fugo” – from a play directed by John Fisher. Word for Word Performing Arts Company, San Francisco, Calif., in 2012. http://kedaradourforallevents.blogspot.com/2012/01/food-stories-at-word-for-word-feast-of.html

2. Photo: Lucy the chimpanzee coloring http://www.radiolab.org/story/91705-lucy/

3. Photo: Lucy the chimpanzee and Janis Carter hugging. (radiolab slide show)

4. Photo: Happy

RadioLab story of “Lucy” – a chimp teaches the ups and downs of growing up human. https://www.wnyc.org/radio/#/ondemand/91705

Oh, The Places They Will Go

Danielle and Jennifer - Thanksgiving 1998

By Judy Berman

I never dreamed I’d see our youngest daughter become a nun – and a pregnant one at that. Or that our eldest daughter would be driven to madness and walking an invisible dog.

That’s not the worst of it.

Our youngest plotted with three friends to knock a woman off for her shoes. And our eldest? She was popping pills and hanging out with someone who was mad as a hatter.

I’m talking, of course, about roles our girls played in school and as adults.

Wherever there’s a kid involved in sports, drama, music or other activities, there’s a parent driving them to the event and cheering them on. That turn on the field or on the stage might lead to a thrilling hobby or to a professional career.

For me, it’s been fun to watch on the sidelines whether they were play acting in school or tapping into their creative side as adults.

We recently saw Jenn perform in The Dixie Swim Club. She was one of five cast members in this play at The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park.

We knew she was a nun in the play. What we were unprepared for was her entrance. She really caught us off guard when she opened the door not far from our seats.

Jenn McGinnis - The Dixie Swim Club at The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park - Sept. 2014

Jenn was eight months along and about to go into labor.

Years ago, when she was in elementary school, Jenn was the conniving girl (Dorothy) plotting with friends (the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Lion), to keep the ruby-red slippers that the Wicked Witch of the West coveted in the “Wizard of Oz.” (I spun that story out just a bit.)

Danielle’s debut as a crazy lady walking an invisible dog was part of a Spanish version of “Little Shop of Horrors.” Her Spanish high school class had a lot of fun with that, and added some improv to the skit.

The pill-popping was when Danielle played Alice, in “Alice in Wonderland.” Give the kid a break. Her character took the pills that made her very, very small … or super big … to escape the crazy Queen of Hearts and the even nuttier Mad Hatter so she could return home.

IMG_0517

Nowadays, Danielle writes and directs plays for her children and others who are home-schooled. She’s already got me in stitches with dialogue she plans for “The Wizard of Oz.” Seems we can’t get away from that classic.

Jenn has directed a play as well. No matter which side of the stage she’s on, she’s having fun.

Looking back, I think of the times I drove them to be part of a drama class and encouraged their acting chops in school.

When that seed was planted, I had no idea what it would lead to

It’s been wonderful to see it come full circle.

 

What activities did you and/or your children do in school that continue to play a part in your life and in theirs?

 

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

1) Main photo: Danielle and Jenn in 1998

2) Jenn McGinnis and cast members in The Dixie Swim Club at The Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park. (Jenn’s the one in the middle with the huge smile.)

3) Danielle Wallace honored for her writing and directing of “Alice In Wonderland” in a school play.

An Old, Dear Friend

Mr. Benjamin Musser and relatives

By Judy Berman

He was nearly eight decades older than me. But, as friends go, the age span was never an issue.

The moment I met Mr. Benjamin Musser, I knew by his kindly eyes and shy smile that he was someone I could trust. He became my fishing buddy, my good friend and my protector.

My parents and I had a room on the third-floor in my Grammy’s row house. I was excited when he moved in just down the hall from us.

Our family quickly adopted Mr. Musser. By family, I mean the WHOLE family. Aunts, uncles and cousins all accepted him as kin. He was included in our family reunions and other get togethers.

At 82, some might envision a frail man bent over and leaning on a cane. Not Mr. Musser. His daily walks put us all to shame.

One time, shortly before Christmas, he went shopping for a Christmas tree with my Mom and me. We must have scoured every tree merchant’s business in the city. I was the lucky one. I got to ride on a sled – up until we finally purchased a tree.

When we got home, my Mom collapsed on the couch. She was just worn out from our excursion. Then, we heard Mr. Musser’s footsteps coming down the stairs.

He took one look at my Mom and said, comfortingly, “That’s it. You rest now. I have to go run some errands.”

Mr. Benjamin Musser 1

Remember the role Mr. Miyagi (Noriyuki “Pat” Morito) played to Daniel Larusso (Ralph Macchio) in “The Karate Kid” (1985)? His lesson was that fighting is “always the last answer to problem.”

I learned a different lesson from Mr. Musser. One about patience.

That’s a critical skill when you’re fishing. First, Mr. Musser put a corn kernel on the hook, and then we’d wait for some unsuspecting fish to take the bait.

We caught a few sunnies that way. He cleaned them and cooked them for our dinner. Some of our cats might have benefited from our outing as well.

The only time my Mom raised an eyebrow about Mr. Musser’s influence is when he – and Grammy – allowed me to have coffee. I was about 6 or 7. They’d pour the scalding, dark brown liquid in a saucer. Added a lot of milk and let me drink it.

Mom hinted this practice might get me booted out of any proper social gatherings. But she didn’t put a halt to it.

One day, after school, I came home with some disturbing news. I told my folks that a man, who was driving a black car, stopped across the street from my bus stop. He told me that he worked with my Mom and offered me a ride home.

I had been conditioned by my folks to never accept rides with strangers and said “no.” When I told my Mom about this stranger, she was rattled.

Mr. Musser volunteered to walk me to the bus and come pick me up when the school bus dropped me off.

At work, Mom asked everyone she knew whether they had offered me a ride or knew any one matching the description I had provided. They didn’t.

Looking back, I feel that I lived in this very loving, protective cocoon. Imagine my reaction when I was nearly 8 and learned that we’d be moving because my Dad had accepted a job in another state.

I didn’t want to go. Mom, trying a bit of psychology, gave me the choice of leaving with them or staying with Grammy and Mr. Musser.

Tears ran streaming down my face as I blubbered that I wanted to stay with Grammy and Mr. Musser. I don’t know what Mom and Dad did to finesse that situation, but I was soon on my way to a new home several hundred miles away.

Mr. Benjamin Musser

While we were miles apart, Mr. Musser remained a friend and a part of our family until he died at 105.

He was the dearest friend anyone of any age could have.

 

 

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Music Video clip: “You’ve Got a Friend in Me,” by Randy Newman. Song in “Toy Story.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zy4uiiy0qgA 

Main Photo: Mr. Benjamin Musser with my Aunt Lois Meyers, cousin Dar Mowery, and Aunt Ida Gilbert. (Thanks to my Aunt Susan Wagner, cousin Sherry and cousin Ruby Reich for sharing these photos.)

Photos: Mr. Benjamin Musser

Shakedown

monopoly - moneybags

By Judy Berman

It is a squeeze play for more money. All the perpetrator lacks is a mask and a gun.

In the old days, such thefts took place by outlaws when robbing riders on stagecoaches or trains.

Now, it’s the banks, car-rental agencies and others who relieve folks of their money. Rather than luring customers in, they’re chasing them away.

My rant is the result of my bank using “statistics” to deny me a lower interest rate. In a letter, unsigned, the bank states that “our decision may have been based in part on a credit score.”

I told the loan officer that another bank has offered me a more attractive interest rate. In a standoff at the O.K. Corral, my bank does not flinch.

So I download my credit report. There are no red flags. No cautionary tales for the loan officer to “Run. Run in the opposite direction. Do not give this person any money.”

Instead, the report reveals that I have an excellent credit score.

stagecoach

My bank’s letter says I am approved for credit for the car loan. But it does not want to give me the reduced interest rate and repayment plan. Instead, the bank aims to go for $5 more a month – an additional $60 a year.

So, my bank decides to shake me down for $5 more a month on a car payment. It’s still willing to do business based on the original, higher interest rate.

Brilliant.

I’d love to meet the bean-counting genius that thinks it’s a great idea to wring a few dollars more from a customer when another bank is salivating for that customer’s business.

Short-sighted. Penny wise and pound foolish.

This also happened a few years ago with a car-rental place.

We turned the car in with a full gas tank. But we didn’t realize that the agreement we signed required a receipt to prove we filled it up that day.

Even though they could see the gas gauge read “FULL,” they dinged us for about $18 more.

Great Train Robbery - screenshot

They may have made a few dollars more, but they won’t see any repeat business from us.

What is it with companies that have lost any sense of treating their customers right?

We also never lose an opportunity to tell people to beware of what they’re signing.

Now, we have a decision to make. One our current bank should have foreseen.

I do appreciate the service they provided at the beginning of our banking relationship. But I’m not feeling very valued right now.

My next move? Undecided.

 

What would you do? Have you ever felt undervalued as a customer?

 

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Video clip: Shakedown – opening song in Beverly Hills Cop II sung by Bob Seger https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk-W_i7Z59I  

Music Video: For the Love of Money by the O’Jays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXE_n2q08Yw 

Main Photo: Monopoly – moneybags – our Hasbro board game

Photo: Stagecoach – Concord stagecoach 1869 – public domain. “used by express companies on the overland trails. Soldiers guard from atop.” http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/41/Concord_stagecoach_1869.png/799px-Concord_stagecoach_1869.png

Photo: “The Great Train Robbery” (1903) – screenshot. Author: Edwin S. Porter Public domain. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b5/Great_train_robbery_still.jpg

Still Crazy After All These Years

 

Dave and Judy - our wedding day - Aug. 18, 1984By Judy Berman

That short walk down the aisle is just the beginning for those who exchange wedding vows.

Our journey began 30 years ago this month and, like everyone else on this path, we navigated some very uncertain terrain.

Many times, we’d look back on the road not taken and wonder “what if?” Such as the decision to wait to trade in our car until it hobbled into the dealership on life support.

“This is my fault?” Dave asks, smiling, as we are out on a morning stroll.

“Someone’s got to take the fall for this, and it’s going to be you,” I inform him.

“OK. I’ll take the fall for it,” he says, laughing.

I have to thank the late Jerry Rosen, his former boss and co-worker, who gave Dave the best advice ever on marriage.

“There are two rules,” Jerry told him shortly after we married.

“Rule number one: The wife is always right. Rule number two: See rule number one.”

It was a win-win situation for me. I mean, for us.

Dave and Judy - our wedding day - Dave looking stunned - Aug. 18, 1984

Here are some other pearls of wisdom on marriage:

  1. Erma Bombeck: “Marriage has no guarantees. If that’s what you’re looking for, go live with a car battery.”
  2. Bill Cosby: “For two people in a marriage to live together day after day is unquestionably the one miracle the Vatican has overlooked.”
  3. Barbra Streisand: “Why does a woman work ten years to change a man’s habits and then complain that he’s not the man she married?”
  4. Nora Ephron: “When you realize you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.” (Harry, played by Billy Crystal, in the movie, “When Harry Met Sally.”)

Dave, thanks for your support, your love and for the laughter. Happy 30th Anniversary. For last year’s post about humorous tips on what makes a happy marriage, see story here.

 What’s your favorite memory? Wedding day? First day on your own? Parenthood?

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Movie clip: “When Harry Met Sally” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMo36SfyQhw 

Music Video: Silly Love Songs – Paul McCartney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wh15LOppcWQ 

1. Main Photo – Ah! The traditional exchange of the wedding cake – Dave and Judy – our daughters, Jenn and Danielle – August 18, 1984

2. Photo – Dave, with the typical newly-wed man look, ‘What have I done?’ August 18, 1984