You’re Wearing What?

Audrey Hepburn (as Holly Golightly) in Breakfast at Tiffany's

Audrey Hepburn (as Holly Golightly) in Breakfast at Tiffany’s

By Judy Berman

How did I fall so far from the graceful style of my idol – Audrey Hepburn?

No matter what she wore – Givenchy or a sweater, slacks and flat ballet shoes – she embodied elegance and confidence. Years ago, that was the self-assured image I aimed for.

Nowadays, it’s all about comfort. I’d ditched the suit and heels that are de rigueur in most workplaces. For me, every day should be Casual Friday. As I rummage thru my closet each morning, I fantasize about what I’d wear if I could.

My passion for fashion is kaput. Now, my go-to choices would be my Life is Good T-shirts and jeans.

Family and friends have hinted – not too subtly – that I need a style intervention. So I was surprised when a few friends invited me to lunch at an upscale eatery and told me: “Come as you are. Don’t bother to change.”

I was clueless as I walked in, even though I saw quite a few family members and friends sitting at tables throughout the restaurant. How odd, I thought, that they should all pick the same place to eat at the same time.

No sooner had I sat down and began looking at the menu choices than I heard the swelling of excited voices. I looked out the window. Nope, no ambulances or police cars. What could it be?

Then I heard the thundering of feet heading our way. It was Stacy and Clinton of  TLC’s fashion makeover TV show, “What Not to Wear.” Still, I didn’t have any foreboding. I should have.

TCS's "What Not to Wear" - Clinton Kelly and Stacy London

TCS’s “What Not to Wear” – Clinton Kelly and Stacy London

This is a show I’ve often dreamed of being on. I’m star-struck. That quickly fades.

They stopped at our table and shoved a microphone in my face. Stacy introduced herself and Clinton to me as a cameraman began recording.

I’m mortified as they show film clips about my obvious fashion faux pas as I schlepped to the mall or grocery store. The indignities pile up as friends laugh while Stacy and Clinton make snide commentaries about each outfit.

Then, they soften the blow by offering me a credit card and a shopping trip in New York City. I’d get to stay with them for a week for a makeover.

Finding clothes that camouflage my flaws is appealing. But, there was just one catch … I’d have to turn over my Life is Good T-shirts.

No doubt my anguished cries could be heard in the next county.

Then, I awoke, in a cold sweat. Had it all just been a dream? I ran to my closet to check.

Whew! My beloved T-shirts were still there.

My go-to apparel - a comfy choice.

My go-to apparel – a comfy choice. (Clothes from my closet. Photo by Dave Berman)

Thanks to Lisa Tognola of Main Street Musings for egging me on to write this. Check out her story about a trunk party at: http://mainstreetmusingsblog.com/2013/02/04/revelations-from-my-first-cabi-party/

 

Movie trailer: “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006). I almost feel sorry for the working girl (Anne Hathaway) who is at the beck and call of one of New York City’s biggest magazine editors, the ruthless and cynical Miranda Priestly (played by Meryl Streep). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zicgut4gpwU

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-13. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo: Audrey Hepburn (as Holly Golightly) in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6b/Audrey_Hepburn_Tiffany%27s_2.jpg/800px-Audrey_Hepburn_Tiffany%27s_2.jpg

Photo: TLC’s “What Not to Wear” with Clinton Kelly and Stacy London http://www.listal.com/tv/not-wear-2003

The Dark Side of the Moon (Landing)

Some dispute that the U.S. sent a man to the moon. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin is the first man to walk on the moon's surface in 1969

Some dispute that the U.S. sent a man to the moon. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin is the second man to walk on the moon’s surface in 1969

By Judy Berman

Over eight days during July 1969, all eyes were on Apollo 11, when it became the first manned mission to land on the moon.

More than 40 years after this historic event, about 6 percent of Americans still dispute that we ever set foot on the moon. They think it was a plot by the government to generate pride during the space race.

It fulfilled a goal set by President John F. Kennedy in 1961, when he said that we would have a man land on the moon “before this decade is out” and return safely to Earth.

Apollo 11 made its landing on July 20, 1969. Neil Armstrong was the first to walk on the moon on July 21st. Who can ever forget his words as he stepped out on the surface, “That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind”?

Yet, Bill Kaysing, considered to be the father of the moon hoax, said the whole event was staged. I interviewed Kaysing in the late 1970s about his book, “We Never Went to the Moon,” when I worked at WOLF-AM, a radio station in Syracuse, New York.

Kaysing, himself, was not an engineer. He was a technical writer for Rocketdyne, a major aerospace contractor. He left that company before Rocketdyne began work on the Apollo project.

And, yet, his story had legs. Some believe, as Kaysing did, that the film footage was taken in the Nevada desert.

I decided to pick an engineer’s brains on this subject: my Dad. He had worked in the space program in Huntsville, Alabama, and later did rocket program work in Nevada.

Dad had an analytical mind and addressed some of the claims in Kaysing’s book. Among them, Kaysing’s claim about the absence of stars when the astronauts were on the lunar surface photography.

Here’s the scoop from the web site science.howstuffworks:

“The light from the sun hitting the surface of the moon is too bright for any camera to capture something in the distance — it would wash out any light coming from distant stars in the sky. Even if you were standing on the surface of the moon yourself, you would have to block the landscape from your vision to see any notable points of light. This happens for the same reason that stars are harder to see in big cities than in wide-open fields — there’s a lot more light bouncing around from street lamps in the city, so the stars are hidden from view.”

Conspiracy theorists also question how the flag could flap with no wind on the moon, and that the photo had to be a hoax. TV’s Mythbusters blew these theories out of the water. (see videos below)

Mythbusters' Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman

Mythbusters’ Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman

Between July 1969 and Dec. 14, 1972, 12 men landed on the moon. The last astronauts arrived on Apollo 17 – Jack Schmitt and Gene Cernan. Cernan was the last to step off the lunar surface and wrote a book, “The Last Man on the Moon,” about America’s race in space.

“Too many years have passed for me to still be the last man to have walked on the Moon. Somewhere on Earth today is the young girl or boy, the possessor of indomitable will and courage, who will lift that dubious honor from me and take us back where we belong,” Cernan wrote.

I just hope it’s real soon.

.—

Video  – National Geographic – NASA’s newly restored video of the very first moonwalks of the Apollo 11 mission in 1969 http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/news/space-technology-news/1969-moonlanding-vin/

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-13. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo: Buzz Aldrin – Apollo 11 – on the Moon – Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module (LM) “Eagle” during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bb/Aldrin_Apollo_11_%28jha%29.jpg/574px-Aldrin_Apollo_11_%28jha%29.jpg

Photo: Mythbusters, TV program, Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage – Skulls Unlimited Owner, Jay Villemarette and Director of Education, Joey Williams with the Mythbusters Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman at the Discovery Channel’s Young Scientists Challenge 2004. Photo by Skimsta. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d5/Mythbusters2.jpg

Video Clip and story: The Faked Apollo Landings http://www.ufos-aliens.co.uk/cosmicapollo.html

Mythbusters examine the Moon Landing photo hoax http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wym04J_3Ls0

Mythbusters tackle other moon landing hoaxes http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/mythbusters/videos/moon-hoax.htm

How Stuff Works – addressing the hoax claims about no stars in the photos taken on the moon http://science.howstuffworks.com/moon-landing-hoax1.htm

Rude Behavior

By Judy Berman

No more “Jersey Shore”? Can it be? Are we done with rude behavior?

In the same year that we mourned the passing of Andy Griffith, many are cheering the impending death of the reality show “Jersey Shore.” MTV announced that “Jersey Shore” is in its “last season amid falling ratings.”

The contrast between the two TV shows couldn’t be starker.

Andy Griffith, who played the kindly widowed sheriff, always was ready with a gentle response to the good-natured shenanigans in small-town Mayberry.

Not so in “Jersey Shore.” Even if you never watched the show, it was impossible to escape its influence. Excerpts of the show’s cast and their escapades were the delight of entertainment news. Their public drunkenness and brawls, their visit to Italy that some feared would lead to a permanent break in U.S.-Italian relations … just more fodder for the publicity machine.

Sad to say, there’s no shortage of uncivil behavior on TV.  I can almost forgive Fox TV’s Chef Gordon Ramsay for his volatile outbursts in the kitchen. After all, we’re talking about chefs preparing food you wouldn’t serve to your dog. But Lifetime’s “Dance Moms” or … groan, TLC’s “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo.” Just appalling.

We’re scraping the bottom of the gene pool here. Is this a case of art (TV) imitating life, or is it life imitating art?

That kind of behavior would have earned me a smack-down and grounding for life by my folks.

Remember when you could “agree to disagree?” When people always heard the other person out – politely – and each side benefited from a healthy exchange of views and opinions. Me, neither.

But  now, it seems whether it’s reality shows or politics, the gloves are off and it’s every man, woman – or even child – for themselves.

The reactions are frequently explosive. Fuses are short. Backlash to a differing viewpoint sometimes turn violent. There’s a flurry of punches and a barrage of ugly, bleeped-out words. The fact that it’s played as entertainment on TV only encourages more folks, who want face time on TV and in the press, to be as nasty as they want to be.

Don’t cry for “Jersey Shore” cast members. Michael “The Situation” Sorrentino already landed another gig on “Celebrity Big Brother” on a UK network, and continues to rake in the big bucks. Snooki and JWoww are in their second season of production in their spinoff show.

But we won’t be better for the experience or exposure to this boorish behavior.

As fellow WordPress blogger, illustrator Mark Armstrong, points out, “The fact that rudeness seems to be the ‘new normal’ just makes things worse.”

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Video: Opening credits (theme song) of “The Andy Griffith Show”

Photo: Nicole “Snookie” Polizzi and Lisa Opie in a Virginia Beach nightclub. Photo taken Dec. 17, 2011 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nicole_Snooki_Polizzi_and_Lisa_Opie.jpg

Photo: “The Andy Griffith Show” – Ron Howard and Andy Griffith http://www.fanpop.com/spots/the-andy-griffith-show/images/14217090/title/andy-griffith-show-photo

Link to Mark Armstrong’s WordPress blog: http://markarmstrongillustration.com

To Mom, With Love

Mom - Mother's Day - Milly Fiet - with me. By Judy Berman

It was late Monday night, and my 3-week-old daughter, Danielle, was fast asleep. So I turned on “The Lucy Show” with Lucille Ball.

On the TV show, Lucie Arnaz (Lucille Ball’s daughter in real life), announced that she was going to leave home. That’s when I began to cry.

I called my friend, Doreen Klee, and told her between tears and gasps of breath that that’s what Danielle was going to do. Dee, a practical and funny mom, brought me back to earth with: “I’d wait until she can at least feed and dress herself first.”

This scenario now reminds me of how my Mom, Milly Fiet, must have felt when I left home when I was 21. My family planned to move down South while I chose to stay in New York.

I saw this scenario thru a different lens when Mrs. Cunningham (played by Marion Ross), on the TV show “Happy Days,” felt life has passed her by. Her children are growing up, and she feels like she’s not needed. So, Mrs. C turns to Fonzie (Henry Winkler), whose apartment is above the Cunninghams’ garage, for a sympathetic ear.

It’s odd how often everyday things remind me of my Mom, who passed in 2001. Too many times, I’ve seen a TV Mom or a skit that hits too close to home and thought of my Mom. Mrs. C. “gave up her secretarial job in order to become a stay-at-home mother and take care of her children, Richie and Joanie,” according to Access Hollywood’s Top 20 TV Moms of All Time.

My Mom did the same after my brother, Hank, was born.

Our house in North Syracuse, N.Y., like the Cunninghams’, was a kid magnet. Mom’s desserts were one attraction. Her sympathetic ear was another. Kids could always count on her to listen attentively to their troubles.

My Mom might be surprised that another TV mom also echoes memories of my childhood. Marge Simpson of “The Simpsons.” Think her high blue coiffure is bad? You should have seen the haircut I gave my Mom – at her encouragement. As a teen, I was confident I could do a layered cut. Boy, was I wrong.

I felt awful. Mom never complained. But she did wear a hat every time she left the house until her hair grew out.

Mom was like Marge Simpson in another way, too. Marge “instills morals, and provides a grounding voice in the midst of her family’s antics,” according to Access. Check. That’s my Mom to a “T.”

Moms. When it’s done right, moms have a tough job, whether they’re stay-at-home working moms, or working-outside-the-home moms.

So here’s to all moms. Happy Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 13th and every day.

—-

* Main photo: My Mom, Milly Fiet, when she was 22, and me when I was 6 months old.

* Photo: Marion Cunningham (Marion Ross) and The Fonz (Henry Winkler) on the TV show “Happy Days.” http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Happy_Days_Fonzie_and_Mrs_C_1977.JPG

* Photo: The Cunningham family on the TV show “Happy Days.”  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cunningham_family_Happy_Days_1974.JPG

* Drawing of Marge Simpson of the TV show “The Simpsons.”  http://www.accesshollywood.com/access-top-20-tv-moms-of-all-time_gallery_2264/image_108501

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

The Truth Is Out There

By Judy Berman

The haunting theme music, investigations of UFOs, aliens and the paranormal were the staples of “The X-Files.”

FBI Agent Fox Mulder (David Duchovny), whose sister had been abducted by aliens, suspected a government cover-up. But his partner, Agent Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson), was more skeptical.

Both agents were assigned to investigate unsolved cases referred to as “X-Files.” During the show’s run from 1993 to 2002, the science-fiction TV show moved to the big screen with “The X-Files: Fight the Future” (1998). A sequel followed, “The X-Files: I Want to Believe” (2008).

Now, a third film is being talked about. But the truth is … it’s not certain if it’s out there.

“There is a very active and relentless fan campaign for a last movie. I do feel like it would be a terrible shame if that didn’t happen,” X-Files producer Frank Spotnitz said in an interview with Sciencefiction.com.

Spotnitz said he’s been talking to X-Files creator and executive producer Chris Carter about this possibility for a long time. “It feels wrong not to give it an ending around the alien colonization of Earth. … I have a clear idea of how it would go.”

At times, I could empathize with Mulder. I want to believe. Other times, I’m very much like Scully. I weigh the evidence, am skeptical about “eyewitness sightings.”

Is Earth the only planet in the whole galaxy that contains life? It doesn’t seem logical. We’re trying to contact other galaxies. Could another galaxy be trying to get in touch with us? Have some already visited Earth?

Some scoff at that notion. They dismiss accounts of Unidentified Flying Objects and/or little gray men as coming from yahoos out drinking in a swamp.

Pro-UFO supporters point to the U.S. Air Force’s Project Blue Book, Area 51 and the 1947 Roswell incident as proof of credible UFO sightings and of a government cover-up about research on aliens – extraterrestrials. (Links to these stories are below.)

So it’s no wonder that the show’s slogans, “Trust No One” and “The Truth Is Out There” were embraced by X-Files’ fans. They also were a natural fit for me. I was a reporter during the show’s run. It was a natural instinct for me to question what I was told and not buy into every snake-oil salesman’s smooth-talking pitch.

That’s why I want to reject the idea of the series’ Cigarette Smoking Man (William B. Davis). He’s plotting with extraterrestrials who plan to wipe out human life. He’s evil personified, willing to sell out the public. But at what cost?

If they succeeded, just how safe would his job be? “No cigarettes for you.”

But, whatever the outcome, I do hope there’s a third movie for the rest of us who can’t get enough of the X-Files.

——-

Do you identify more with Fox Mulder or Dana Scully?

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

—-

Main photo credit of Fox Mulder (played by David Duchovny) and Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson)

http://www.fanpop.com/spots/the-x-files/images/19918135/title/x-files-wallpaper

Photo credit: Fox Mulder’s office in “The X-Files”

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_X-Files_Office.jpg

“How Area 51 Works”

http://science.howstuffworks.com/space/aliens-ufos/area-51.htm

“Unidentified Flying Objects – Project Blue Book” and “The Roswell Incident”

http://www.archives.gov/foia/ufos.html

BUELLER? BUELLER?

By Judy Berman

Playing hooky. Taking a mental health day off from work. Did you ever wish you played it like Ferris Bueller? Breaking all the rules. Cool, charming and utterly over-the-top outrageous. That escapism appeals to me.

What would that innocent-looking scamp be up to today? Maybe he’d kick it up a notch when he ditches work.

A short clip of an ad that will run during the Super Bowl on Feb. 5th is already teasing the audience about the prospects of a grown-up Bueller. Matthew Broderick, who played Ferris in John Hughes’ 1986 film, will be 50 in March. (The complete ad was released Monday, Jan. 30th, after I wrote this. Its link has been added below.)

Broderick is at it again. Just like Bueller did in the opening of the movie, Broderick opens the curtains and looks directly at the camera. He confides to the audience, “How can I handle work on a day like today?”

I skipped work once when I was about 21 at my first job. Like Bueller, I also headed downtown. No, I didn’t jump on a parade float as Ferris did and serenade the crowd with Wayne Newton’s “Danke Schoen” or The Beatles’ version of “Twist and Shout.”

But there was a crowd. It was lunchtime, and among those milling about the shoppers was my boss – an older gent.

We briefly exchanged glances. I had on shades and a white winter parka. I continued walking with my friends, hoping – no, fervently praying – that he’d think he must be mistaken.

When I returned to work the next day, my boss never quizzed me about my absence. We never talked about this. But I didn’t repeat that escapade ever again in ANY of my jobs.

I still aspire to be Ferris, to have his savoir faire in dealing with a snooty waiter at an exclusive restaurant. Or in putting one over on the school dean as Ferris did to his, Edward R. Rooney, played by Jeffrey Jones. Rooney is bound and determined to catch Ferris and end the teen’s deception once and for all.

Ferris wasn’t the only one in the film milking an opportunity. He convinced his best friend, Cameron (Alan Ruck), to let him borrow his Dad’s prized convertible, a 1961 Ferrari GT California. (“The insert shots of the Ferrari were of the real 250 GT California,” Hughes explains in a DVD commentary, according to Wikipedia. “The cars we used in the wide shots were obviously reproductions. There were only 100 of these cars, so it was way too expensive to destroy.”)

Someone as devious as Ferris couldn’t wait to get his hands on that hot convertible’s steering wheel. The teens – Ferris, Cameron and Ferris’ girlfriend, Sloane Peterson (played by Mia Sara) – dropped the car off at a parking garage. Then, a scheme worthy of Ferris quickly unfolded. Ferris and friends barely had their backs turned when the garage attendants peeled out of the garage and took the rare car for a joy ride. As they did, Yello’s “Oh, Yeah” blared thru the streets.

An enviable heist. It was returned unharmed. But the garage attendants had racked up several hundred miles on the odometer.

Ferris, whatever you might be up to, I hope it’s another glorious romp. If it is, I’d love to be along for the ride.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Photo: of Matthew Broderick as Ferris Bueller

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferris_Bueller

Yello’s “Oh, Yeah” music video:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Yello+Oh+Yeah+Ferris+Bueller+video&mid=EAB5AA7D103A829F7731EAB5AA7D103A829F7731&view=detail&FORM=VIRE1

The full ad was revealed Monday, Jan. 30th. (This is in no way an endorsement of any product. The reveal is just to show you what will be on Super Bowl on Sunday that was the subject of my original blog.)

http://tv.msn.com/tv/article.aspx?news=699644

D’oh, A Simpsons Marathon Challenge

By Judy Berman

Irreverent underachiever Bart Simpson and his Duff-beer guzzling Dad, Homer, would love this: a contest to watch The Simpsons’ shows and break an old Guinness World Record.

It’s a call this couch potato finds hard to resist. A chance to win $10,500. Starting Feb. 8th, in Los Angeles, contestants in The Simpsons Ultimate Fan Marathon Challenge will watch up to 500 continuous episodes of The Simpsons in an attempt to break the current record of 86 hours, 6 minutes and 41 seconds.

The 500th episode, “At Long Last Leave,” will air Sunday, Feb. 19th (8  to 8:30 p.m. ET/PT) on Fox. In this show, “the Simpsons are evicted from Springfield and join an off-the-grid community outside of town. But when Homer and Marge try to sneak back into town,” they are met with hostility.

The scrapes and shenanigans that The Simpsons get into are legendary. In the 23 years it’s been on the air, they’ve skewered the classics of Edgar Allan Poe’s, “The Raven,” (in “Treehouse of Horror“) and parodied “Goodfellas” (in “Bart the Murderer”) and “Citizen Kane” (in “Rosebud”).

But some of their finest hours were when they were just being themselves. Bart, in a role that Ferris Bueller would have loved, slips away from a class field trip and sneaks into the television show where “The Krusty the Clown Show” is taped. This is where, in “Bart Gets Famous,” he makes the catchphrase, “I didn’t do it,” said after he trips over a prop and nearly causes a disaster. The audience went wild, and Bart became an instant celebrity.

My youngest daughter, Jenn, swears she never had a social life in the early 1990s when The Simpsons’ shows ran on Thursdays. Her duty? She had to stay home and tape the shows for me. As Bart would say, “Don’t have a cow, man!”

I was hooked from the beginning of the show. That’s when Bart’s chalkboard punishment was on display (“The Boys’ room is not a waterpark”). Then, he’d jump on his skateboard, survive several close calls and make it home before Dad. After the family all jumped on the couch, the real fun began.

What keeps viewers returning? The show’s never boring. In a parody of “Dallas’ Who Shot J.R.,” a cliffhanger in May 1995 arranged a similar fate for the despicable CEO of the town’s nuclear power plant. “Who Shot Mr. Burns?” kept viewers in suspense until the show returned in September. The infamous chalkboard read: “I will not complain about the solution when I hear it.”

So, let me check. Just how long do I have to watch to win? More than 86 hours? Ay, caramba! Not even for Bart.

Photos: Who Shot Mr. Burns? (May and September 1995)

For more information on the contest, go to The Simpsons’ official Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/thesimpsons or visit http://www.thesimpsons.com/ to receive news updates, including the exact date and time for open registration.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Judy Berman and earthrider, 2011-14. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to (Judy Berman) and (earthrider, earth-rider.com, or earthriderdotcom) with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.